Tiny Tank [Free Verse]

Someone put a tiny, limp-gunned tank 
on Danube west bank --
in Budapest, opposite Parliament.

Unsubtle symbolism, indeed,
but worth noting:

The might of violence
made feeble in the face of democracy,
and all that.

So true,
and yet so few
seem to believe it.

We seem to believe
that matching savagery
is the key to strategy
in opposing the extreme,

but then we've really just made more
extremism, haven't we?

Bronze Goblin [Free Verse]

The bronze goblin 
rides the world.

Its wide eyes always open,
taking in everything 
that happens on the street:

brisk business-like strides
of mid-morning,

mid-day strolls,

slumped evening plods,

midnight staggers,

and witching hour stumbles.

It sees you when you're meeting,
and knows when it's legit.

DAILY PHOTO: Sculpture and Façade of Blumentál Church, Bratislava

Image

DAILY PHOTO: Where Old Commies Go to Die, Budapest

Taken in the summer of 2002 at the Szoborpark [Memento Park] outside Budapest

Apparently, reaching for things was big with the Commies. I couldn’t help but notice that a lot of the statues in Budapest’s Szoborpark [Memento Park] (the place where all the old rounded-up Commie artwork was taken to be scrutinized without being honored.) I assume they didn’t often catch what they were reaching for, or they wouldn’t have died out, having their art moved out to low-rent suburbs.

DAILY PHOTO: Inanimate Camel Art

Taken on the Sacred Way [Beijing Ming Tombs] in the summer of 2008
Taken in Dubai in 2017
Taken in Amritsar in April of 2016

BOOK REVIEW: The Art of Darkness by S. Elizabeth

The Art of Darkness: A Treasury of the Morbid, Melancholic and MacabreThe Art of Darkness: A Treasury of the Morbid, Melancholic and Macabre by S. Elizabeth
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Amazon.in Page

Release: September 6, 2022

As the title suggests, this book collects a diverse group of artworks that share the common theme of the macabre. While most of these works are paintings, a few photos and sculptures are included. It’s also predominantly Western (European and North American) art, but some exceptions exist, notably several Japanese works are included. Where the collection really shows its breadth is in the styles of art and eras included. The works range from more than half-a-millennium old to some produced within the last couple years, with the expected variations in styles and media, given the centuries covered. The collection is also varied with respect to the popularity of the pieces and artists. You’ll likely see some familiar works (e.g. Fuseli’s “The Nightmare,” Bosch’s “The Garden of Earthly Delights,” and Dalí’s “The Face of War.”) However, most of the works were new to me. (Granted, I’m a visual arts neophyte.)

The pieces are arranged into four topical divisions, each containing three chapters. The subjects include realist content such as: bodily ailments, crime, dark takes on nature, and architectural ruins. However, much of the book delves into surreal and supernatural subject matter, including: nightmares, hallucinations, gods, monsters, ghosts, and magic.

The book lets the art do the heavy lifting, but it does have brief chapter introductions and captions for each piece that includes not only the title, artist, and (if known) the year the art was released, but also some interesting tidbits about artwork and / or artist. These write ups are concise, intriguing, and well-written, and offer some fascinating insights. The book also presents numerous quotes from poets, artists, and other intellectuals.

I learned a great deal from reading this book and discovered some new favorite artworks, art that is beautiful or grotesque but often a combination of both — but always evocative. If you’re interested in how artists depict the darkness in the lives and souls of humanity, you should definitely give this book a looksie.


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