DAILY PHOTO: Mount Pandim

Taken in May of 2022 in Sikkim on the Goechala Trail

DAILY PHOTO: Thangsing Camp, Sikkim

Taken on the Goechala Trail at Thangsing Camp in May of 2022

DAILY PHOTO: Rhododendron & Khangchendzonga [and Vice Versa]

Taken in May of 2022 near Dzongri

DAILY PHOTO: Foggy, Mossy Forest

Taken in May of 2022 on the trail between Tsoka and Dzongri in Sikkim

BOOK REVIEW: Forest Walking by Peter Wohlleben & Jane Billinghurst

Forest Walking: discovering the trees and woodlands of North AmericaForest Walking: discovering the trees and woodlands of North America by Peter Wohlleben
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Amazon.in Page

Out: April 26, 2022

Wohlleben’s “The Hidden Life of Trees” was one of those rare books that profoundly changed the way I looked at the world, and so I was eager to read his forthcoming work. This book is at once narrower in focus (i.e. intended to appeal to the North American market, specifically,) but also much much broader (i.e. reflecting upon not just the trees but the other species that reside among them as well as how humans can best get around within the forest.) It might seem strange for Wohlleben (a German forester) to do a book on the North American forests, and I suspect that’s one reason that his one-time translator / editor (Jane Billinghurst) became his co-author. [I don’t know where Billinghurst is from, but she does add many North America-specific vignettes to the book.]

Like “The Hidden Life of Trees” this book is packed with intriguing insights into woodland environments. The twenty-one chapters aren’t explicitly divvied up, but there’s a clear logic to the grouping of chapters. An opening chapter focuses on the importance of having a multi-sensory experience in the woods, and then chapters two through five are concentrated on trees and their various parts.

Chapters six through eight explore species that work on, with, and against trees, with particular focus on fungi and other species that break down and recycle forest material. Chapters nine and ten turn the attention to how to help kids get the most out of their forest experience. The next couple chapters consider how to get the most of seeing the forest at unconventional times, i.e. night and during varied seasons. Then there are a few chapters investigating how to observe other lifeforms of the forest, particularly animals and insects.

Several chapters follow that explore how humans can survive and thrive in wooded ecosystems, including everything from wilderness survival / primitive living skills to dressing to save oneself from ticks and chiggers.

I learned a lot from this book. As I mentioned, it’s full of intriguing little tidbits about the forest.

The opening sentence of the book’s Introduction did mention it being intended as a book one would take into the forest with one, and I would say it’s not that book at all. It’s the kind of book one reads before going out (and probably returns to after coming back) but it’s just not organized in such away to make it worth lugging around (i.e. it’s not like a field guide – set up to allow one to rapidly find what one is interested in on the fly.)

That said, you’ll learn a lot from reading it, and I’d highly recommend it.


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DAILY PHOTO: Boulder & Mountain

Taken in the Annapurna Sanctuary in the summer of 2018

DAILY PHOTO: Evergreen Trees on the Mountain

Taken in the summer of 2019 at the Kolsai Lakes in Kazakhstan

Wide Open Spaces [Free Verse]

out of my cell 
&
onto the trail

i walk the vast expanse,
the vault of heaven above
&
hills of rolling green
beneath my feet

and clouds barge through
blue skies
like thoughts barge through
my mind -

sluggishly
but
inevitably