DAILY PHOTO: An Emperor’s Jail

Taken on October 12, 2013 at Agra Fort.

Taken on October 12, 2013 at Agra Fort.

The top of this tower is where Shah Jahan was imprisoned by his son, Aurangzeb–the latter being the 6th Mughal Emperor. The 5th Emperor’s “cell” offered a great view of the Taj Mahal, the monument that Jahan built to his wife, Mumtaz Mahal.

This just goes to show that just because one kills off one’s brothers who are ahead of one in line for succession, and imprison one’s own dad,  doesn’t mean one has to be completely heartless.

This is what Jahan would have seen-- except from about one story up and a couple hundred feet to the left.

This is what Jahan would have seen– except from about one story up and a couple hundred feet to the left.

 

DAILY PHOTO: Red Fort

Taken on October 16, 2013

Taken on October 16, 2013

This white marble palace constructed in the Indo-Islamic style is one of the more impressive structures in Old Delhi’s Red Fort.

The Red Fort should be visited before visiting Agra Fort, because it should be seen but it’s not as impressive as its Agra kin. I did it the other way around, and the Red Fort was a disappointment by comparison. The grounds aren’t kept up, most of the semi-precious gemstone inlays are missing from the ornately carved marble, and the fort houses an architectural hodgepodge. That being said, the red sandstone walls are imposing and magnificent and the few historic structures are quite impressive–if not as much so as in Agra.

Close up of the same structure.

Close up of the same structure.

DAILY PHOTO: Jama Masjid

Taken October 14, 2013 in Old Delhi.

Taken October 14, 2013 in Old Delhi.

This is India’s largest mosque. It is capable of holding 25,000 worshipers–mostly in that open courtyard that can apparently be covered as needed.)  It dates back to the rule of Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan–who you may know of from his requisitioning of the Taj Mahal.

It’s located in Old Delhi and is usually matched with trips to the Red Fort and Chandni Chowk (a huge bazaar street), which are both nearby.

It’s mostly Red sandstone with white marble, as was common of Shah Jahan’s other monumental structures.

[I realize it’s a cheat that I’ve posted two “Daily Photos” in a couple of hours of one another, but it’s a new day in the States–and I’ve got a ton of photos from my recent trip.]